Exhibits & Events

Upcoming & Ongoing Events

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Dr. Carter G. Woodson African American Museum

Preserve | Present | Interpret

 

As a public health precaution due to COVID-19 (coronavirus), The Dr. Carter G. Woodson African American Museum will remain temporarily closed.

*All scheduled programming will take place virtually.

 

 

The museum presents the historic voice of this St. Petersburg, Florida community from the perspective of local, regional, and national history, culture, and community. It is another demonstration of the commitment to revitalize the Midtown St. Petersburg area.​

The museum joins Mercy Hospital at the Johnnie Ruth Clarke Health Center, the Royal Theater Boys and Girls Club, and the renovated Manhattan Casino as evidence of the renaissance of this area.

Current Exhibit

Black Lives Matter Mural

When

Currently on Display

Where

Dr. Carter G. Woodson African American Museum

Admission

Open to the Public

What

This community’s first BLACK LIVES MATTER mural is the most beautiful one in the nation, and it is the welcoming mat to our most historic African American community Jordan Park, and the beautiful Dr. Carter G. Woodson African American Museum. While the museum remains closed, all are invited to visit the new mural.

T-shirts 👕

PURCHASE A T-SHIRT OR MURAL PRINT HERE

The “Free-ish” t-shirts and Black Lives Matter Mural t-shirts are now available for a $20.00 donation.

Also available are the Black Lives Matter Mural Prints.

Items are available for pick-up Tuesday – Friday, 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Roll to the Polls 2020

When

Oct 17 (Press Event) / Oct 24 / Oct 31

Where

Tropicana Field

Admission

Free to the Public

What

Honoring the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis. 

In a demonstration of democracy, October 24 and 31Voting is Our Voice is sponsoring a Roll to the Polls motorcade. Residents are asked to join us in a procession to the polls as we honor the legacy of the Honorable John Lewis. This safe and fun parade will begin at 1:30pm with staging in Tropicana Field Lot 4. We encourage participants to decorate their cars, bikes, motorcycles, golf carts or whatever means you choose to roll in, as we celebrate our right to vote.

Press Event – Saturday, Oct 17 / Roll to the Polls – Press Release

Beginning at 10:30 am “Voting is Our Voice” organizers and partners will rally in their vehicles during a Press Conference which will kick off activities in conjunction with getting out the vote.  Immediately following the Press Conference, volunteers will be taking our efforts to the street. Motorcading through neighborhoods, sign waving and knocking on doors to remind residents the importance of returning their mail-in ballot.

Roll to the Polls – Saturday, Oct 24 & Saturday, Oct 31

Register for Roll to the Polls

Beginning at 1:30 pm, staging for a motorcade will occur in Tropicana’s Lot 4 where bicyclist, motorcyclist, skaters, those on golf carts, cars, and trucks will “Roll to the Polls.” Saturday, October 31, vehicles will be creatively decorated as a part of our demonstration of democracy. Masks, t shirts, water bottles and other novelty items will be available for the first 1,000 participants.

Voting is Our Voice is a collaboration between Dr. Carter G. Woodson African American Museum and Women Talk Black. Voter empowerment is the core of this initiative. Launched earlier this year, our goal is to deliver resources and programming to support efforts around voter education and increased civic engagement.   

Upcoming Events

Ebony Muses / Curious Collector Conversation Cafe

When

Saturday, Oct 24, 2020 | 10:30am - 11:30am

Where

The Dr. Carter G. Woodson African American Museum

Admission

Free and open to the public.

What

Kara Walker – The Artist in Black & White

Register for this Online Zoom Event

Don’t Let COVID-19 Stop You from Voting

When

Now Through Election Day (Tuesday, Nov 3)

Where

See below...

Admission

Free

What

Without a doubt, COVID-19 has changed how we live our lives. We’re working remotely from home, our children are learning through virtual classes and we’re using video conferencing as a way to stay in touch with family and friends.

Those changes show we didn’t let COVID-19 stop us from doing what’s important. We just found a way to do them safely. The same is true for the Nov. 3 election. You can make sure your voice is heard and still be safe.

The rhetoric in the bitter presidential race has left some people discouraged, wondering if voting even matters. It does. Our country is at a crossroads, where whoever wins the presidential race will impact the direction for much more than a four-year term.
But this election is about more than the presidential race. This election is also about choosing sheriffs who keep our communities safe, commissioners who make decisions on what we’ll pay in taxes and how that money is spent in our counties, and school board members who help decide the quality of education our children receive.
Now that you know the stakes, here are ways you can stay safe while voting.

Voting by mail

This is a good option if you’re concerned about voting in person because you have a high-risk medical condition, if you’re a caregiver for someone who does or if you’re not comfortable being in public settings.

You must request a ballot by 5 p.m. Oct. 24.

Return your completed ballot as soon as possible and check with your county’s Supervisor of Elections Office to make sure it has been received and accepted. In addition to mailing your ballot, you can put it in a secure drop box at the main and branch offices for your elections supervisor and at early voting sites.

The ballots must be received by 7 p.m. on Election Day.

Voting early

Each county is required to offer early voting for at least eight days before the election, but officials can add more days. Check with your county’s Supervisor of Elections Office for dates, times and locations.

The benefits of voting early include smaller crowds, shorter lines and being able to vote on weekends. As with any time you’re in public, make sure you wear a mask, practice social distancing and wash your hands or use hand sanitizer if you touch a shared surface.

Drive Thru Drop Off Location

The Woodson has teamed up with Women Talk Black, the Rays and more than 60 community partners through a get out the vote initiative entitled Voting is Our Voice. Voting is Our Voice promotes St. Petersburg’s ONLY Drive Thru ballot drop off. Beginning Monday, October 19 from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm the Ballot Drive Thru location at the Trop, located at Gate 1 will be available with the ease of dropping off your ballots without getting out of your car. The Drop Box will be monitored by a representative from the Supervisor of Elections Office.

Roll to the Polls

In a demonstration of democracy, October 24 and 31, Voting is Our Voice is sponsoring a Roll to the Polls motorcade. Residents are asked to join us in a procession to the polls as we honor the legacy of the Honorable John Lewis. This safe and fun parade will begin at 1:30pm with staging in Tropicana Field Lot 4. We encourage participants to decorate their cars, bikes, motorcycles, golf carts or whatever means you choose to roll in, as we celebrate our right to vote.

Voting on Election Day

This is typically when you’ll see the largest crowds and longest lines. But you can still be safe by following the rules we’ve been living by for months: wear a mask, stay at least six feet away from others and use hand sanitizer or wash your hands after touching any shared surface.

Try to avoid the busiest times of the day, like before and after work and during lunch. And it’s best to not bring your children or other people who aren’t voting with you to the polls to keep them from being exposed to COVID-19. Many companies, including Florida Blue, have flexible policies to make sure their employees have time to vote.

Voting During a Pandemic

While COVID-19 is an experience we’ve never encountered before, this isn’t the first time the country has had an election during a pandemic. In 1918, the Spanish flu spread across the United States, peaking in the weeks before the November election. There wasn’t a presidential election that year, but important topics for that time, like alcohol prohibition, were on the ballot in several states.

Voters were encouraged then to follow the same precautions we are using today: wear a mask, keep a safe distance between each other and to “exercise all sanitary precautions.”

Our country did it then and we can do it now. Stay safe and make your voice heard.

We are requesting everyone to get out and vote because “Voting is Our Voice.”

Please consider joining us in demonstrations of democracy Roll to the Polls and begin taking our message to the streets sign waving; neighborhood motorcades; and dropping important campaign related literature (all non partisan).

Most sincerely,
Terri Lipsey Scott, Executive Director
Dr. Carter G. Woodson African American Museum